(Ancient sacred) sites      ley circle 1    ley circle 2      crop circles 2021  
copyright Bert Janssen - MagicalandMysticalEngland.com
Avebury
West Kennet Long Barrow
Silbury Hill
Winterbourne Bassett
 
Ley Circles
Ley Circles
Ley Circles
Please read also Landscape Geometry
In addition to ley-lines, at least 2 ley-circles are present in the Wiltshire landscape. The circles are accentuated by 15 churches and some ancient sites such as the East Kennet Long Barrow and Giant's Grave. Although the churches are obviously not prehistoric, do realise that they were built on sacred pagan sites and altars that were founded at the same time as Avebury was built. Or Silbury Hill, the East and West Kennet Long Barrows, the Stone Avenue, the Sanctuary, and Stonehenge. This means that the virtual circles are at least 4500 years old.

Click above on  + Ley circle 1  and on  + Ley circle 2  to see where these circles are. You can also check the  Ley circle 1  and  Ley circle 2  boxes above the the Map to see which churches and landmarks make up these circles. As you can see, the 2 circles do not pass through each other's centre and therefore do not form a Vesica Piscis. However, we can add 2 circles (using the 2 centres of the original circles) that do form a Vesica Piscis. Click above on  + Small circles  to reveal these circles. Also click  + Baseline  to see how all the elements are aligned.

We can now construct a triangle, using both the original ley circles and the added smaller circles. Click  + Triangle . This triangle has curious angles of 51.51 degrees making it identical to the outline of the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. Let this amazing 'coincidence' sink in for a moment. As the outline of the Great Pyramid defines Squaring the Circle, the triangle in the Wiltshire landscape also defines Squaring the Circle. The base of the triangle defines the dimensions of a square and the height of the triangle defines the dimensions of a circle, whereby the circumference of this circle is identical to the perimeter of the square. Click on  + Squaring the Circle  to see this.

What makes the already amazing presence of 'squaring the circle' in the landscape even more mystifying is the fact that the Saint Michael Alignment or Michael line runs exactly parallel to the base of the triangle. Click above on  + Michael line .
But not only that. The angle under which the Michael line (and the base of the triangle) runs through the landscape is exactly the right one to define (again) 'squaring the circle', although this time based on equal surface areas. Click all geometries off except the Michael line and subsequently click on  + StC Michael . The surface area of the circle is identical to the surface area of the square. The size of this 'squaring the circle' set is not relevant. Every size 'squaring the circle' (based on surface areas) will fit.
 
 
Please read also Landscape Geometry.
In addition to ley-lines, at least 2 ley-circles are present in the Wiltshire landscape. The circles are accentuated by 15 churches and some ancient sites. Although the churches are obviously not prehistoric, they were built on ancient sacred pagan sites and altars that were founded at the same time as Avebury was built making these virtual circles at least 4500 years old.

Click above on  + Ley circle 1  and on  + Ley circle 2 . You can also check the  Ley circle 1  and  Ley circle 2  boxes above the the Map. The 2 circles do not pass through each other's centre and therefore do not form a Vesica Piscis. However, we can add 2 circles (using the 2 centres of the original circles) that do form a Vesica Piscis. Click above on  + Small circles  to reveal these circles. Also click  + Baseline  to see how all the elements are aligned.

We can now construct a triangle, using both the original ley circles and the added smaller circles. Click  + Triangle . This triangle has curious angles of 51.51 degrees making it identical to the outline of the Great Pyramid of Giza in Egypt. Let this amazing 'coincidence' sink in for a moment. As the outline of the Great Pyramid defines Squaring the Circle, the triangle in the Wiltshire landscape also defines Squaring the Circle. The base of the triangle defines the dimensions of a square and the height of the triangle defines the dimensions of a circle, whereby the circumference of this circle is identical to the perimeter of the square. Click on  + Squaring the Circle .

What makes the already amazing presence of 'squaring the circle' in the landscape even more mystifying is the fact that the Saint Michael Alignment or Michael line runs exactly parallel to the base of the triangle. Click above on  + Michael line .
But not only that. The angle under which the Michael line (and the base of the triangle) runs through the landscape is exactly the right one to define (again) 'squaring the circle', although this time based on equal surface areas. Click all geometries off except the Michael line and subsequently click on  + StC Michael . The surface area of the circle is identical to the surface area of the square. The size of this 'squaring the circle' set is not relevant. Every size 'squaring the circle' (based on surface areas) will fit.
 
 
The book 'the Organizing Principle' elaborates on this landscape situation and many others of comparable quality...